Q & A Archives

Message Board Archives

Cockpit

  • I am a bit concerned about the cockpit room. I am 6'5" and I don't want to be building and find out after I mount the canopy that I am too tall for the aircraft. the 24" longerons leave me with only a bit at the shoulders...Any of you guys with airframes have a person my size try yours on? if so, how did they fit?
Date: 96-03-15 09:38:50 EST
From: RIHNAIRCO
Pilots as tall as 6'5" have fit in and flown the prototype. This is the outside limit of the envelope, however. It all depends upon your body geometry. Long legs short torso, long torso, short legs. It all depends.
  • I am about to weld up the rudder pedals and I am wondering about the way the cylinders are attached to the primary structure, this means the toe brakes must move forwards a bit as the rudders are moved, I assume this must work ok, but I would be interested in hearing a comment from someone who has flown it, it does feel right? (Ref. Dwg 151). I am pretty sure other sets of rudder pedals I have seen, have the cylinder attached to the pedal itself so that the toe brake moves with the pedal.
Date: 96-11-05 01:36:28 EST
From: Dan Rihn
The rudder pedal/brake pedal configuration as drawn woks fine. This is a similar design to the Pitts aircraft as well as many other designs. Tack weld the rudder pedal before you do the final welding, some people have found that they prefer a longer rudder pedal, as much as 1/2 inch longer, you should make the pedals fit your personal preference.
 
Date: 96-11-06 21:56:56 EST
From: N107DJ
I put taller rudder pedals in my one design , I flew the proto-type alot and found I was pushing with the middle of my foot. I made mine up to suit me. the brakes work great.

Hints and Tips

Re:Adjustable seat back
Date: 95-03-04 21:27:47 EST
From: SKYBOLT55
I have the drawings to the adjustable seat back. The problem is I built it to Doug's plans today and it did not fit the seat bottom. I'll call him Mon. His dimmensions don't add up. They are building one way and drawing another. I've seen the fuse. and it works good.

 

Re:Rudder Pedals
Date: 96-01-13 15:27:03 EST
From: RIHNAIRCO
I found the geometry of the rudder pedal brake pedal assembly uncomfortable for my body geometry. Roger rourke solved the problem for me by creating adjustable pedals and modifying the heel scuff plate. It is now great !
 
Re: Roll Bar
Date: 97-05-03 01:18:13 EDT
From ACKROMAN
THE ONE THING I WISH I HAD DONE DIFFRENT IS LAY THE ROOLBAR BACK A LITTLE FURTHERDR7-1-122 SHOWS .22" OFFSET AT THE TOP OF THE ROLLBAR. THIS IS THE 1/4 SCALE DEMENSION NOT THE ACTUAL DEMINSION I SUSPECT SHOULD BE .88" I SET MINE AT 1" AND WISH IT WERE STILL FURTHER I AM A 6'1" PILOT AND LIKE TO MOVE MY HEAD ALSO FOR US TALLER PILOTS SET UP THE SEAT BACK ADJUSTMENT LUGS (PART -23 ON PRINT DR7- 1-122) TO FIT THE FRAME LUGS WITH OUT THE ADJUSTER BAR IN PLACE THIS GIVES YOU A EXTRA 1" RECLINE, AND YOU CAN STILL USE THE ADJUSTER BAR IF YOU WANT. JUST MAKE SURE THE LOWER SEAT BACK ADJ IS ALL THE WAY BACK
RE: Throttle Lever
Todd W. Ashcraft
Comments: Since the stick in the One Design is so beefy (co-workers called it the Battle Club), I wanted a throttle lever that gave the same feeling of strength and "power" rather than the usual flat- plate-with-a-knob-stuck-on-the-end homebuilt throttles.  I found a ready-made bicycle handlebar extension at Wal-Mart that is SUPPOSEDLY made from aircraft grade aluminum.  This is the thing the touring guys bolt on the ends of the handlebars so they can tuck their elbows in, I guess.  Anyway, they come 2 per pack for about $12, and can be easily stuck on the end of a 4130 steel tube.  This tube should be long enough to pass through a slightly larger 4130 tube (slide fit) which should be cut about an inch long and welded to the truss to act as a bushing for the throttle.  At the outboard end  of the smaller tube, weld a flat arm (4130, at least .063" thick) onto the end, with the proper hole(s) in it to attach the throttle cable.  The lengths of the two tubes can be varied to move the throttle arm/cable away from the truss without hitting the skin panel, and because the store-bought throttle lever is fastened AROUND the inboard end of the smaller tube, the swing arc of the arm and cable can be moved to any position and still give acceptable throttle movement to the pilot.  I would suggest that once the relative position of the lever and arm assemblies are nailed down, you put a bolt through the lever and smaller tube for safety against the lever spinning or coming off.  Also, instead of welding the arm onto the end of the smaller tube, I made a slide-on assembly from a leftover piece of the larger tube (which in turn bolts to the smaller tube) so the overall length can be easily tweaked and the welds don't ride on the outboard edge of the bushing.  I know how hard this is to visualize, so you can call me if I didn't explain it very well and I'll try to send a drawing soon.